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Sprint and Arizona State Come Together for 5G and IoT

Arizona State University and telecommunications company Sprint recently announced a joint initiative that will focus on 5G and the Internet of Things (IoT), consisting of bringing 5G connectivity to campus, producing a new IoT curriculum, plus several joint research projects.

Sprint said its new True Mobile 5G technology will support the initiative, which the company has delivered as a wireless mobile service to nine cities around the country, including Phoenix, plus Curiosity IoT, a "5G-ready" IoT network and operating system. 5G's benefits focus not necessarily on faster communications speeds but on reduced latency, an important aspect of IoT.

The arrangement also includes creation of a Sprint 5G incubator at the university's Novus Innovation Corridor, one of six innovation zones run by the school that bring researchers and industry together for collaborative activities.

Under the agreement, Arizona State and Sprint will also work with the state of Arizona to deliver high-speed connectivity to rural areas.

"Our collaboration with Sprint exemplifies the broad benefits of a university-corporate relationship," said Sethuraman Panchanathan, the university's chief research and innovation officer, in a statement. "The entire university community and those throughout the greater Phoenix metropolitan area will benefit directly from this collaboration by having access to Sprint's network and through the educational and research aspects that will usher in new innovations in technology."

About the Author

Dian L. Schaffhauser is a freelance writer based in Northern California.

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